WSJ – Art Related Articles from the Wall Street Journal that I find Interesting

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/peter-doigs-art-of-getting-lost-fcd7ad02?mod=Searchresults_pos10&page=1

https://www.wsj.com/articles/manet-and-degas-were-painters-of-modern-life-bb7fcd58?mod=Searchresults_pos1&page=1

https://www.wsj.com/articles/georgia-okeeffe-beyond-flowers-1cf3a486?mod=Searchresults_pos8&page=1

https://www.wsj.com/articles/great-wave-print-auction-77a48cbf?st=taj4m5dj8ra31vh&reflink=desktopwebshare_permalink

https://www.wsj.com/articles/picassos-guitar-on-a-table-sells-for-37-1-million-at-sothebys-11668473578?st=k2t02ikhbrl4lhm&reflink=desktopwebshare_permalink

https://www.wsj.com/articles/paul-allens-art-collection-sets-record-with-1-5-billion-sale-11668048273?st=14a0j1etsfepiqf&reflink=desktopwebshare_permalink

Joan Brown (installation view, SFMOMA)
; photo: Katherine du Tiel

https://www.wsj.com/articles/joan-brown-review-bay-area-painting-san-francisco-museum-of-modern-art-11672264347?mod=Searchresults_pos1&page=1

 

Gustav Klimt’s Mysterious and Last Portrait Breaks Record With $108.4 Million Sale

‘Lady with a Fan’ was found sitting on the easel of his studio after he died.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/gustav-klimt-lady-fan-sale-9187e6ec?mod=Searchresults_pos2&page=1

https://www.wsj.com/video/gustav-klimt-last-portrait-breaks-european-auction-record/20714B98-959D-4F3A-A449-E54F28388F2F.html?mod=Searchresults_pos1&page=1

InstallaFon view, Young Picasso in Paris, Solomon
R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, May 12–
August 6, 2023. Photo: Midge WaZles © Solomon
R. Guggenheim Foundaton, New York.

‘Young Picasso in Paris’ Review: A Giant Comes of Age

Fifty years after the Spanish painter’s death, the Guggenheim shows an eye-opening exhibition of his early works, a diverse array of stylistic experiments.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/young-picasso-in-paris-review-a-giant-comes-of-age-4ea04e4f?mod=Searchresults_pos3&page=1

Edvard Munch, Summer Night by the Beach, 1902–3, oil on canvas. Private collection, © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

‘Edvard Munch: Trembling Earth’ Review: Man Screams, Nature Whispers

The Clark Art Institute shifts the narrative surrounding the Norwegian painter in a revelatory exhibit showcasing his artistic dedication to the Earth’s beauty, from moonlit beaches to wintry forests.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/edvard-munch-trembling-earth-review-man-screams-nature-whispers-68da01ff?mod=Searchresults_pos4&page=1

An IPO for a Painting? This $55 Million Masterpiece Is Going Public

A portrait by British painter Francis Bacon will be publicly listed this summer, even as rising interest rates blur the case for investing in art

https://www.wsj.com/articles/ipo-francis-bacon-portrait-george-dyer-art-market-4a66000a?mod=Searchresults_pos6&page=1

 

Giovanni Battista Moroni, ‘The Gentleman in Pink’ (1560). JOHN FERRO SIMS/BRIDGEMAN IMAGES

Thinking Pink, Centuries Before Barbie

Long before it became a symbol of femininity, the color had both spiritual and fashion appeal

Barbie and pink are practically synonymous. So much so, that the makers of “Barbie” the movie, coming to theaters July 21, disrupted the global supply chain trying to get their hands on enough pink paint. That is a lot of fuss over a color often dismissed as merely pretty.

A dyed fiber inside a bead found at Mohenjo-Daro, in modern Pakistan, shows that early societies knew how to make pink dye from the madder plant, Rubia tinctorum, as early as 3000 B.C. But it was only in the Middle Ages that color began to take center stage. In Japan during the Heian era, 794-1185, the elite wore pink to convey refined feelings, such as the exquisite sadness inspired by the transient beauty of the cherry blossom.

The European attitude towards pink was influenced by Christianity. The Renaissance artist Fra Angelico, an early innovator in color symbolism, gave his angels robes of pink, the color of flesh, and wings of gold, the color of light, to illustrate how the Holy Spirit transcended the boundary between heaven and earth.
 
 

 

The Art Market Hits a Wall

Christie’s sold $3.2 billion in art during the first half of 2023, a 23% drop from the year before as sellers held onto more of their art trophies

 

The blistering art market is finally cooling off. 

For years, the world’s chief auction houses seemed impervious to volatile stock-market swings, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, and historic inflation. Even amid the pandemic, Christie’s and Sotheby’s quickly pivoted online, and art values kept soaring. Now, the veneer is cracking.

 

Sales at Christie’s and Sotheby’s slowed dramatically this spring as seasoned collectors chose not to ply their art troves into an uncertain economy. Auction executives and dealers alike agree the current slump may not drag everything down like the recession of 2008. But the market is bracing for shrunken sales that draw fewer jaw-dropping prices, as savvy collectors choose to hang onto their treasures rather than sell them at auctions.

“We’re in a changing market,” said Guillaume Cerutti, Christie’s chief executive, calling it solid but “less impressive.”

https://www.wsj.com/articles/christies-art-market-downturn-373ed39c?mod=Searchresults_pos1&page=1

 

‘The Curatorial Imagination of Walter Hopps’ Review: Seeing Like a Visionary

An exhibition at the Menil Collection traces the curator, gallerist, and museum director’s long and revolutionary career of discovering artists who then became part of the mainstream, from Pop artist Ed Ruscha to photographer William Eggleston.

 

‘Untitled’ (c. 1962) by Joe Goode PHOTO: THE MENIL COLLECTION/JOE GOODE

Houston

Museum curators are much like movie directors. Their audiences may recognize their names yet be much more interested in the talents being showcased. Curators of Old Master exhibitions, and shows featuring art from cultures historically removed from us, may have impressive scholarly credentials; on the other hand, those who deal with contemporary artists—especially those not yet household names—are usually a different breed, and Walter Hopps (1932-2005) was unique among them. Tall, handsome, bespectacled, with an imposing cleft chin, he was more like the contemporary art world’s equivalent of the rock-music impresario Bill Graham, who was Hopps’s contemporary—in discovering, promoting and explicating artists not yet textbook standard.

 

The Curatorial Imagination of Walter Hopps

The Menil Collection, through Aug. 13

“The Curatorial Imagination of Walter Hopps,” on view at the Menil Collection through Aug. 13, is necessarily a wildly inclusive exhibition, featuring some 130 works of art, mostly of modest size, by 70 artists whom Hopps discovered and exhibited during his restless half-century career. They include Billy Al Bengston, Ed Ruscha, Joe Goode, Larry Bell, George Herms, and, in a way, Ed Kienholz. (The great assemblagist Kienholz was a partner in Hopps’s first gallery and his “Walter Hopps Hopps Hopps,” 1959, a wooden cutout Bardahl man with candy, pills, and animal vertebrae attached, stands like a sentinel at the entrance to the show.) The exhibition is a crackling survey of a unique art steward’s taste and mind.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-curatorial-imagination-of-walter-hopps-review-seeing-like-a-visionary-70cec571?mod=Searchresults_pos2&page=1

 

 

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